The Man Who Wrote the Book on Informal Learning

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Scrolling through our Twitter feed on Monday, I saw several references to Jay Cross.  Jay wrote the book Informal Learning: Rediscovering the Natural Pathways That Inspire Innovation and Performance in 2006. Jay credited Peter Henschel, director of the Institute for Research on Learning (IRL) with the term informal learning but Jay’s book became the popular go-to reference on the topic.

Jay died last Friday.  Jay did not know Lisa and me but we knew who he was. Jay was an elearning visionary and used the internet to broadcast, test, and refine his ideas, make friends, and engage with colleagues around the world. Many loved and respected him. Harold Jarche writes about Jay here, Jane Hart gathered Twitter tributes to Jay, and Clark Quinn linked in this blog post to many people who cared about Jay, and were changed by him.

Anyway, I re-opened Informal Learning and tried to capture–graphically–a few key points that resonate with me. I hope they enrich your understanding of informal learning aka free-range, self-directed, and DIY learning and some of the changes prompted by the worldwide connectivity of the internet.

 

 

 

coffeeroom_learning_attribution

internet_change_attribution

evolution_learning_attribution

self-reliance_communications

knowledge_worker_attribution

formal_informal_learning_attribution

golf_learning_attrib

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail
1 reply

Trackbacks & Pingbacks

  1. […] a sequel to Jay Cross’s highly successful book on Informal Learning. (We wrote about him and it here last November.) Cross intended to “help millions of people learn to learn, increase their […]

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!

Leave a Reply