Posts

The Man Who Wrote the Book on Informal Learning

Scrolling through our Twitter feed on Monday, I saw several references to Jay Cross.  Jay wrote the book Informal Learning: Rediscovering the Natural Pathways That Inspire Innovation and Performance in 2006. Jay credited Peter Henschel, director of the Institute for Research on Learning (IRL) with the term informal learning but Jay’s book became the popular go-to reference on the topic.

Jay died last Friday.  Jay did not know Lisa and me but we knew who he was. Jay was an elearning visionary and used the internet to broadcast, test, and refine his ideas, make friends, and engage with colleagues around the world. Many loved and respected him. Harold Jarche writes about Jay here, Jane Hart gathered Twitter tributes to Jay, and Clark Quinn linked in this blog post to many people who cared about Jay, and were changed by him.

Anyway, I re-opened Informal Learning and tried to capture–graphically–a few key points that resonate with me. I hope they enrich your understanding of informal learning aka free-range, self-directed, and DIY learning and some of the changes prompted by the worldwide connectivity of the internet. Read more

Curiosity, creativity, & the internet

Lisa’s post last week on Meaningful work for you and the world compelled me to hit the pause button.

She touched me with her descriptions of Pope Francis’s passion for people, and organic farmers’ passion for healthy food and sustainable agriculture. She also made me think about how we find and act on our passion, and how creativity plays into it.

I went to the Live Your Legend website explored in her post to learn more about how this organization helps “people find work they love that makes a difference in the world by connecting like-minded people together both online and in person.” The inspiration and tools I found there impressed me, just as the work of Encore Tampa Bay helping people in the middle stage of life refocus on their passion and purpose after long careers that ended voluntarily or rudely, enthuses me, too. Read more

BYOD (+SD) to Freelance When and Where You Want

Educated self-starters with digital skills and tools can freelance, earn income, and network to learn to stay ahead of the crowd.

My husband had an outpatient surgical procedure recently. He received excellent care, everything went the way it was supposed to, and he was discharged within the estimated time. What interested me (beyond his quick recovery) is that two of the three RNs who cared for him are contract workers. These professional freelancers projected the same caring attitudes and skill set as the employee nurses. The freelancers were open and friendly making them very approachable; I asked them about their work arrangements. Read more

Internet, Digital Technology, and Aging Well

From the time we are born, everyone is aging. I just have more experience at it. We should all be so lucky.

So said a speaker at the first listening session at the 2015 White House Conference on Aging (WHCOA) held in Tampa on February 19. The WHCOA listening series started in Tampa and will continue in Phoenix, Seattle, Cleveland, and Boston before the Conference convenes late in 2015. The listening sessions are an opportunity for those interested in public policy to help all Americans age with dignity and health in the most independent living environment that we can manage. Ideally a majority of us wish to stay in our own homes, but if that isn’t possible, then in supportive settings that allow us to experience life as fully as possible for as long as possible.

History of Aging Programs in America

2015 is the 80th anniversary of the passage of the Social Security Act, our country’s first and most comprehensive effort to date to help people survive losing their income due to disability or advanced age. President and Mrs. Roosevelt in the White House spearheaded the passage of the Act to keep sick and old people out of the proverbial poor house. However, it took the federal policy recommendations of the 1961 White House Conference on Aging and the leadership of Presidents Kennedy and Johnson to convince Congress to implement Medicare and Medicaid, and the Older Americans Act in 1965, 50 years ago. More recently, WHCOAs have led to Congress-legislated protections for older workers from job discrimination (for those over age 40 because many employers wished to avoid paying into retirement plans or higher health care costs for their workers), annual cost of living adjustments in Social Security benefits, and Long Term Care ombudsmen to help residents of long-term care facilities. Other programs preventing elder abuse, assisting elders with legal issues and adult protective services have been added in the last decade. Millions of Americans—as well as their families—depend on these public pillars to live with less vulnerability and more security. Read more

Terms and Tools a la Internet and Web

ICYMI (abbrev.): in case you missed it

The Oxford Dictionary added a lot of new words, including ICYMI, to its online database this summer. Other new words–clickbait, live-tweet, hyper-connected, and tech-savvy–fascinated me, too, because of their connection to information technology. Katy Steinmetz shared their definitions and many more words in the online Time magazine in August. In case you’re wondering:

clickbait (n.): (on the Internet) content whose main purpose is to attract attention and draw visitors to a particular web page.

live-tweet (v.): post comments about (an event) on Twitter while the event is taking place.

hyper-connected (adj.): characterized by the widespread or habitual use of devices that have Internet connectivity.

tech-savvy (n.): well informed about or proficient in the use of modern technology.

These words are part of the onrush of new-everything related to the internet and web. And it’s more than a torrent of words that we are trying to keep up with. In the foreword to Jim Boulton’s 100 Ideas that Changed the Web, he recognizes the enormity of the changes that we are struggling to comprehend and grow with in order to “work, play, shop, socialize, and otherwise participate in society” as enabled by the internet and web. Read more